Quad. Corner - Uxmal by Gordon Nicolson

Quad. Corner - Uxmal by Gordon Nicolson

Quad. Corner - Uxmal

Gordon Nicolson

Title

Quad. Corner - Uxmal

 
Artist
Year
c. 1940  
Technique
vintage gelatin silver print 
Image Size
16 x 19 15/16" image and paper 
Signature
artist's stamp verso 
Edition Size
not stated 
Annotations
ink titled, lower left 
Reference
 
Paper
 
State
 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
19727 
Price
SOLD
Description

From a series of photographs of pre-Columbian ruins by Gordon Nicholson.

Uxmal is an ancient Maya city of the classical period in present-day Mexico. The name Uxmal means "built three times" in Mayan, referring to the construction of its highest structure, the Pyramid of the Magician (Templo de Adivino). The Mayan would often build a new temple over an existing one. Uxmal was one of the largest cities of the Yucatan peninsula, and at its height about 25,000 Mayans resided there. There are indications that its rulers also presided over the nearby settlements in Kabah, Labna and Sayil.

Uxmal is located in the Puuc region and is considered one of the Maya cities most representative of the region's dominant architectural style.Puuc architecture has several predominant features, most notably constructions with a plain lower section and a richly decorated upper section.

The Nunnery Quadrangle is a collection of four buildings around a quadrangle. It was named Casa de las Monjas (The Nunnery) by the Spanish because the 74 small rooms around the courtyard reminded them of nuns' quarters in a Spanish convent. Many typical Puuc embellishments, including Chac (god of rainfall) masks are arranged on over another vertically, serpents and lattice work.