Richard the Opossum by Paul Hambleton Landacre

Richard the Opossum by Paul Hambleton Landacre

Richard the Opossum

Paul Hambleton Landacre

Please call us at 707-546-7352 or email artannex@aol.com to purchase this item.
Title

Richard the Opossum

 
Artist
Year
1936  
Technique
wood engraving 
Image Size
4 3/4 x 5 3/4" image size 
Signature
pencil signed, lower right 
Edition Size
38/60, Wien states 45 impressions 
Annotations
pencil titled and editioned 
Reference
Wien 194; Zeitlin & Ver Brugge 72; Lehman, p. 165 
Paper
soft ivory Japanese wove 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
TOPE130 
Price
$2,500.00 
Description

A disarmingly sweet image of one of nature's most misunderstood creatures, Paul Landacre captures a North American opossum surveying its stash of fruit. His signature black ink-heavy composition and steady, regular linework lends an elegance to an otherwise ordinary scene featuring the marsupial, a persimmon, and a bunch of grapes, one lone orb having escaped.

Opossums - or, simply "possums" - are the only marsupials found north of Mexico. Outside of mating, these nocturnal creatures are usually solitary. Their teeth allow them to eat many different types of food, usually found on the ground, and their ability to digest almost anything edible gives them a broader range than humans. Landacre portrays this opossum as if he is a recurrent, yet welcomed, visitor. Landacre loved nature, making the animal world a rich selection of worthy subjects. His imagery included, but was not limited to, the chipmunk, seal, horse, pelican, roadrunner, snake, bat, penguin, owl, swordfish, boar, house cat, and even the dinosaur and wooly mammoth—all refined in his unique style.

Paul Landacre was born in July 1893 in Columbus, Ohio and attended Ohio State University until he was suddenly crippled by a debilitating illness. In 1916, he moved to Chula Vista, California to convalesce and he found solace in drawing the landscape and purchased his first linoleum blocks. He moved to Los Angeles in 1922 to attend classes at the Otis Art Institute. Woodengraving was not part of the curriculum so he was self-taught. He worked as a commercial illustrator, married Margaret McCreery in 1925, and devoted himself to woodengraving in 1926.

He taught at the University of Southern California, the Otis Art Institute and the Kahn Institute and was a member of and exhibited with the California Society of Etchers, the California Print Makers Society, the American Society of Wood Engravers, and the American Society of Etchers. Landacre became the pre-eminent American woodengraver, an honor bestowed by Rockwell Kent and Carl Zigrosser. His mastery of the medium led to his election to the National Academy of Design in 1946. Landacre illustrated award winning books of poems and his first solo book, California Hills and other Woodengravings of 1931 won Fifty Books of the Year.

 

Please call us at 707-546-7352 or email artannex@aol.com to purchase this item.