The Crier (after Cornelius du Sart) by Cornelis Ploos van Amstel

The Crier (after Cornelius du Sart) by Cornelis Ploos van Amstel

The Crier (after Cornelius du Sart)

Cornelis Ploos van Amstel

Title

The Crier (after Cornelius du Sart)

 
Artist
Year
1776 (org. 17th c.) 
Technique
transfer technique with roulette and burnishing 
Image Size
7 7/8 x 6" platemark 
Signature
"Corn: du Sart.", lower left, within image. 
Edition Size
ca 300 
Annotations
Amstel's personal reproduction stamp (coat of arms with a banner, on piece of turf) on the verso; pencil annotated: "Corn. Dusart. del. Ploos. Amstel. J.C. Fecit. 1776" 
Reference
Laurentius 29, pg. 240-241, Laurentius and Niemeijer 29, pg. 268, Rijksmuseum RP-P-OB-24.612 
Paper
antique-white laid 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
21312 
Price
$800.00 
Description

Cornelis Ploos van Amstel reproduced drawings of Masters using a unique transfer technique with added roulette and burnishing that he developed in the mid 18th century. This example, done in 1776, is after a drawing by Cornelius du Sart, done 100 years before practical photography was invented.

Arthur Edwin Bye wrote an article on Amstel's work and techniques in the Print Collector's Quarterly, Volume 13, No. 4, December, 1926. A man of wealth, he was a drawing collector with over 5,000 drawings by 16th and 17th century masters. Between 1765 and 1787 he produced 46 facsimilies, in editions of 300 - 350 impressions.

His work in printmaking was studied by Dutch connoisseur N. G. van Huffel in the early 20th century. Van Amstel used 3 processes to print: to imitate crayon drawings, color mezzotint and a third method that reproduced sepia, india ink and color.

For the crayon drawings he traced the original drawing with red crayon on oiled paper, transferred this to a stronger sheet and then finished the drawing by hand. He then put fine copper shavings on the back of the drawing after adding adding a gum to the back. He then took a prepared copper plate and fastened the drawing on it. He then traced his drawing through the paper, which transferred the copper shavings to the plate. When the plate was bitten the lines transferred. He then added roulette and used burnishing to achieve highlights.

To copy the watercolor and wash drawings he used a variation on the above technique and added aquatint and/or bit the plate using acid washes and a variation of mezzotint.