The Tyresmith by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

The Tyresmith by James Abbott McNeill Whistler

The Tyresmith

James Abbott McNeill Whistler

Title

The Tyresmith

 
Artist
Year
1890  
Technique
Transfer lithograph 
Image Size
6 11/16 x 7" image size (with the legend removed) 
Signature
printed butterfly, lower left center on wall 
Edition Size
from the edition of between 500 - 1,000 printed on supplementary stones by the Way firm for the 15 N 
Annotations
 
Reference
Cat. no. 36, pg. 152, A Catalogue Raisonne I, The Lithographs of James McNeill Whistler, The Art Institute of Chicago, in association with the Arie and Ida Crown Memorial, NE2312.W45A4 1998; Levy 41; 
Paper
smooth ivory wove 
State
I/I, published 
Publisher
T.R. Way 
Inventory ID
20891 
Price
$1,250.00 
Description

Quoted from The Art Institute of Chicago (AIC), The Lithographs of James McNeill Whistler, Vol. I catalogue raisonné, pg. 153:

"Smithies and forges fascinated Whistler throughout his career, and are frequent subjects in both his etchings and lithographs. The Tyresmith, his second lithograph dealing with the theme (see cat. no. 27 for the first), depicts the interior of a wheelwright's workshop in Chelsea. It was one of five lithographs (cat. nos. 34-38) transferred and proved in October 1890... According to an annotation in T.R. Way's hand on an impression in the British Museum, London, the two smiths working at an anvil are "Mending the Hoop."

"The Way firm transferred The Tyresmith to supplementary stones and machine printed a large edition for the 15 November 1890 issue of The Whirlwind. It was the second of three lithographs Whistler contributed to the journal (see also cat. nos. 34, 37), and it appeared opposite a sonnet by Stephane Mallarme."

"The published edition was machine printed from supplementary stones on smooth ivory wove paper, which has often discolored to cream. Periodical impressions tend to be slightly coarser, glossier, and higher in contrast than those printed by hand. Many impressions have been timmed to remove the legend." Such is the case with this impression.