Ostricart by Ellen Lanyon

Ostricart by Ellen Lanyon

Ostricart

Ellen Lanyon

Title

Ostricart

 
Artist

Ellen Lanyon

  1926 - 2013 (biography)
Year
1968  
Technique
lithograph 
Image Size
15 3/4 x 11 1/8" image size 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
86 of 100  
Annotations
pencil dated after signature, titled in lower left and editioned in lower center 
Reference
 
Paper
cream Arches wove with partial watermark 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
19897 
Price
$300.00 
Description

The large flightless Ostrich is native to Africa and has a lifespan of thirty to forty years. It is the largest and heaviest living bird and the male can grow to a height of nine feet. The Ostrich has adapted to running to escape predators and its long, thick and powerful legs can cover great distances; they can sprint in short bursts up to forty-three miles per hour. One stride can be ten to fifteen feet long. They have cloven hoofs consisting of only two toes. When in danger and cannot run, the Ostrich can deliver a powerful kick. These large birds are nomadic, wandering where they find food; they eat various seeds, grasses, bushes and forage on trees. They have no teeth so they swallow sand and pebbles that help them grind their foods in their gizzard. They are omnivores and will eat insects, snakes and rodents. The male ostrich may have as many as five mates who lay their eyes in the same nest, which is incubated by the male at night. Contrary to popular myth, the Ostrich does not bury its head in the sand; they do use their wings for balance and display wing and tail feathers in courtship.

Ostrich racing has been going on for centuries and is a common practice in Africa. The powerful birds pull two or four-wheeled carts, or jockeys ride on their backs. The Chandler Ostrich Festival in Arizona has been an annual event for twenty-five years. Each Ostrich wears a canvas harness on its back to protect its feathers and give jockeys something to hold onto.