Mandala VII by Worden Day

Mandala VII by Worden Day

Mandala VII

Worden Day

Title

Mandala VII

 
Artist

Worden Day

  1912 - 1986 (biography)
Year
1964  
Technique
5-color woodcut printed on black paper 
Image Size
18 1/2 x 23 1/4" image 
Signature
white ink, lower right 
Edition Size
100 of 200  
Annotations
titled and initialed in white ink in the lower left 
Reference
IGAS catalogue, Series No. 60, Sept. 1964 
Paper
black Japanese Moriki paper 
State
published 
Publisher
IGAS (International Graphic Arts Society, Inc.) 
Inventory ID
16210 
Price
$1,200.00 
Description

'Mandala VII' was published by the International Graphic Arts Society (IGAS) in Series No 60, September, 1964. IGAS published a number of prints every year in editions of 210. 100 of these were sold in Europe and 100 in the US, there were 10 proofs. With this business model an artist's work could develop an international following, and many museums subscribed to their publications.

Worden Day wrote about this woodcut: " 'Mandala VII' is the most recent woodcut of a series I have been creating around the circular image. This print emerged from the combined play of vertical and horizontal mahogany grains...."

Day studied at Atelier 17 in New York in the early 1940s. Information on her unusual methods of printing her early woodcuts can be found in 'A Spectrum of Innovation...' by David Acton, page 190.

Day was born in 1916 in Columbus, Ohio. She earned her B.A. at eighteen years of age from Randolph-Macon Woman's College in 1934. She moved to New York City where she studied with George Grosz, Jean Charlot and Hans Hofmann. Day also studied at the New School of Social Research, the Florence Crane School, and the Art Students' League with artists Maurice Sterne and Emilio Amero. She worked at Stanley William Hayter's Atelier 17 in 1943, and in 1966 she received her M.A. degree from New York University at the age of fifty.

Worden Day taught at the Pratt Institute, the New School of Social Research, the Art Students' League and the University of Wyoming at Laramie. She was honored with J. Rosenwald Awards and two Guggenheim fellowships. Her work is represented in the collections of Library of Congress, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Worcester Art Museum, to name a few.