La Porte Guillaume, Chartres by Allen Lewis

La Porte Guillaume, Chartres by Allen Lewis

La Porte Guillaume, Chartres

Allen Lewis

Title

La Porte Guillaume, Chartres

 
Artist

Allen Lewis

  1873 - 1957 (biography)
Year
1913  
Technique
drypoint 
Image Size
10 x 5 1/8" platemark 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
45 of 102  
Annotations
pencil annotated "imp", beneath signature; titled & dated "17" in lower left margin, annotated "Proof no. 45". 
Reference
1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition #6656 
Paper
buff vellum 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
11440 
Price
$350.00 
Description

Allen Lewis headed to Paris in 1894 at age 21. In 1900 Allen Lewis' work, along with fellow Americans James A.M. Whistler and Joseph Pennell, was accepted in the printmaking section of the Paris Salon.

This drypoint was done in 1913 in Paris before Lewis returned to the U.S. It shows the La Porte Guillaume, which was built at the end of the 12th century. It then was one of the gates of the enclosure surrounding the city of Chartres. It bears the name of Guillaume de Ferrieres, vidame of Chartres.

Like Whistler would often do, Lewis forces the viewer to look through the gate of the fortress to the light of the city beyond. The foreground is wiped dark and the drypoint lines are indistinct, implying only the impression of two figures. The massive gateway is even darker and foreboding. Once you enter into the city the figures and architecture becomes more distinct. 'La Porte Guillaume' barbican was destroyed in 1944 by the Germans.

This print is from the collection of Dewitt and Dorothy Jayne. Dewitt Jayne was a nephew of Allen Lewis and a a first cousin thrice removed of James McNeill Whistler.