Sleeping Bear Sioux by Leonard Baskin

Sleeping Bear Sioux by Leonard Baskin

Sleeping Bear Sioux

Leonard Baskin

Title

Sleeping Bear Sioux

 
Artist

Leonard Baskin

  1922 - 2000 (biography)
Year
1993  
Technique
color lithograph 
Image Size
39 1/2 x 27" image 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
proof; regular edition 50 
Annotations
proof 
Reference
 
Paper
cream wove BFK Rives 
State
proof 
Publisher
Gehenna Prints, Maine 
Inventory ID
MMAE120 
Price
$1,800.00 
Description

Done after a photograph by Frank Albert Rinehart, taken on October 7, 1898 at the Omaha Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition Omaha, Nebraska; Douglas County; Omaha. Sleeping Bear was a member of the Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux).

The Lower Brulé Indian Reservation is a reservation that belongs to the Lower Brulé Lakota Sioux Tribe. It is located on the west bank of the Missouri River in Lyman and Stanley Counties in central South Dakota. It is adjacent to the Crow Creek Indian Reservation on the east bank of the river. The Kul Wicasa Oyate (lower…men…nation), the Lower Brulé Sioux, are members of the Sicangu (Burnt Thigh), one of the bands of the Lakota Tribe. Tribal headquarters is in Lower Brule.

The Sioux consist of a group of self-governing tribes speaking one of three dialects of the Siouan language: Dakota, Nakota and Lakota. The Dakota or Santee, known variously to themselves as Mdewakantonwan, Wahpetowan, Wahpekute, or Sisseton, range from the Ohio River valley to South Dakota. The Dakota or Nakota, known as the Ihanktonwan/Yankton or Yanktonai/Ihanktonwanna, range from eastern Minnesota to the Missouri River valley. The Lakota, or Western Teton/Tituwan Sioux, consisting of the Oglala, Mniconjou, Sicangu, Sihasapa, Oohenunpa, Hunkpapa, and Itazipco, traditionally ranged from lands east of the Missouri River valley to the Rocky Mountains. A common history and language, a strong respect for the land and nature, the common use of Pipestone and the reverence held for the stone, and ceremonies such as the Sun Dance, Sweat lodge, and Vision Quest bind these peoples together.

The name 'Brule' comes from the French word brûlé (burnt), the name French fur traders used for the Sicangu in the late 17th century. The Sicangu divided into the Lower Brule and the Heyata Wicasa, or Upper Brule, in the late 18th century. The Lower Brule favored lands where the White River empties into the Missouri River, while the Upper Brule lived further south and west.

Taken in part from Wikipedia.