Rites of Spring by Martin Barooshian

Rites of Spring by Martin Barooshian

Rites of Spring

Martin Barooshian

Title

Rites of Spring

 
Artist

Martin Barooshian

  1929 - PRESENT (biography)
Year
1959  
Technique
color woodcut 
Image Size
11 1/8 x 13 1/8" image size 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
20 
Annotations
none 
Reference
 
Paper
Tableau paper 
State
 
Publisher
 
Inventory ID
MAB103 
Price
$1,000.00 
Description

This colorful and whimsical color woodcut by Martin Barooshian, done in 1959, shows the influence of the Surrealists and his personal interest in the work of Arshile Gorky.

In 1956, Barooshian was in Paris where he studied printmaking at Atelier 17 with S.W. Hayter. His early work was influenced by the Surrealists, Gauguin, William Blake and Gorky.

The artist uses a variety of block cutting techniques and deep oil based colors that move from dark to light, as well as representative references to singing birds and biomorphic shapes to create his composition.

"The Rite of Spring" was a 1913 ballet and concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky that was performed by Diaghilev's Ballet Russes and choreographed by Najinsky, creating a near riot when it was first performed. It appeared to be a musical theme without a melody, only a loud, pulsating, dissonant chord with jarring, irregular accents.

One of the dancers recalled that Vaslav Nijinsky's shocking choreography was physically unnatural to perform. "With every leap we landed heavily enough to jar every organ in us." The music itself was angular, dissonant and totally unpredictable. The audience responded with hisses and catcalls.