(Foreigner in Yokohama) by Unidentified

(Foreigner in Yokohama) by Unidentified

(Foreigner in Yokohama)

Unidentified

Title

(Foreigner in Yokohama)

 
Artist
Year
c. 1860  
Technique
color woodcut 
Image Size
5 7/8 x 3 7/8" image size 
Signature
artist's stamped brush signature, in image, upper mid-left 
Edition Size
not stated 
Annotations
titling in Japanese characters, upper left 
Reference
 
Paper
Japanese laid 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
22657 
Price
Price On Request 
Description
Yokohama was the harbor of Japan where Western foreigners were first allowed--and confined to--immediately following the Treaty of Kanagawa, in which the U.S. militarily forced Japan to enter trade negotiations. Yokohama-e ("e" translating to "pictures") is the formal term for the expression of the Japanese woodcut art that reflected this change, with around 500 images created primarily by 31 artists between 1859 and 1862. Portraits of Westerners and their trains, ships, and daily lives soared in demand. This portrait of what is likely a wealthy American trader, with his mutton chops, cane, and proud stance, is recorded with signature Japanese subtlety, perfectly capturing the collision of two worlds.