Now, Ever Awake, My Master Dear, I Fear a Deadly Storm by Anne Ryan

Now, Ever Awake, My Master Dear, I Fear a Deadly Storm by Anne Ryan

Now, Ever Awake, My Master Dear, I Fear a Deadly Storm

Anne Ryan

Title

Now, Ever Awake, My Master Dear, I Fear a Deadly Storm

 
Artist

Anne Ryan

  1889 - 1954 (biography)
Year
1947  
Technique
color woodcut on black-tinted wove 
Image Size
8 1/8 x 10 1/8" image size 
Signature
white ink, lower right 
Edition Size
proof 
Annotations
 
Reference
Indianapolis Museum of Art accession number 1994.92 
Paper
thin, black-tinted wove 
State
 
Publisher
 
Inventory ID
22398 
Price
$700.00 
Description
In addition to her visual artistry, Ryan was a poet and author heavily involved in the literary circles of Greenwich Village in the 1920s and 30s. It's possible that she borrowed the title of this piece from poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge's interpretation of the The Ballad of Sir Patrick Spens. An English ballad with roots in the 13th century, it tells of a maritime disaster predicted by the sailor Patrick Spens, who eventually goes down with the doomed ship. Several iterations of this ballad have surfaced in popular culture throughout the centuries; Coleridge's "Dejection: An Ode", remains among the most quoted. Written by the poet to a forbidden love, the interpreted stanza reads, "Late, late yestreen I saw the new Moon / With old Moon in her arms; / And I fear, I fear, my Master dear! / We shall have a deadly storm."