The Night Shift Chicago (aka: The Night Shift 92nd Street) by Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

The Night Shift Chicago (aka: The Night Shift 92nd Street) by Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

The Night Shift Chicago (aka: The Night Shift 92nd Street)

Bror Julius Olsson Nordfeldt

Title

The Night Shift Chicago (aka: The Night Shift 92nd Street)

 
Artist
Year
1911  
Technique
etching 
Image Size
7 13/16 x 11 3/4" platemark 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
not stated 
Annotations
inscribed Imp. after the signature, and titled and dated in lower lower left margin 
Reference
AIC CSE exhibition 03/1912; Panama Pacific International Exposition 6857; Chicago Historical Society ICHi-30035; illusrtated page 46, figure 31 in 'Bertha Jaques and the Chicago Society of Etchers', Joby Patterson. 
Paper
ivory wove 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
20800 
Price
SOLD
Description

B.J.O. Nordfeldt uses etching to depict the architectural skyline of South Chicago in 1911. As far as you can see the great steel mills belch forth smoke and flame from their tall chimneys. A train, used to haul both the raw ore and finished product, is in the foreground. In the lower right foreground a line of people, many with umbrellas, march to their night shift jobs in the mills, which ran 24 hours a day.

Nordfeldt exhibited an impression of this print at the 1912 Chicago Society of Etchers Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was also exhibited in the 1915 Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco, where he won a silver medal for his printmaking.

Illinois Steel (by then also known as Federal Steel, a holding company created by Chicago lawyer Elbert H. Gary in 1898) became part of the giant entity U.S. Steel, the world's largest entity, engineered by banker J.P. Morgan. U.S. Steel closed some of the Chicago-area mills, but the South Works—which employed about 11,000 people in 1910—stood as one of its largest plants.