(Los Angeles low riders) from "Heat Wave" by Charles Bukowski) by Kenneth Price

(Los Angeles low riders) from Heat Wave by Charles Bukowski) by Kenneth Price

(Los Angeles low riders) from "Heat Wave" by Charles Bukowski)

Kenneth Price

Title

(Los Angeles low riders) from "Heat Wave" by Charles Bukowski)

 
Artist

Kenneth Price

  1935 - 2012 (biography)
Year
1995  
Technique
color screenprint 
Image Size
10 3/16 x 7 9/16" image size 
Signature
pencil signed by printer, Tim Owens in lower right 
Edition Size
P/P (Printers Proof) aside from the published editions 
Annotations
pencil signed, titled, dated and annotated: "Design: Ken Price / Screen Printing T.J. Owens" 
Reference
 
Paper
white Arches wove 
State
proof 
Publisher
Black Sparrow Graphics, Black Sparrow Press 
Inventory ID
20380 
Price
$425.00 
Description

An illustration by Kenneth Price for the Charles Bukowski publication "Heat Wave," published by Black Sparrow Graphic Arts in 1995. This impression is from the collection of the printer, Tim Owens, and is signed and annotated by him: "Design: Ken Price / Screen Printing: T.J. Owens."

Black Sparrow Press notes about "Heat Wave": "The 31 poems (a number of them previously unpublished) that comprise Bukowski's text reflect the decay of the inner city, the over crowding, the congested traffic, the casual violence and finally the implicit courage of the populace as they attempt to live lives of quiet (and not so quiet) desperation. This urban nightmare clearly had a powerful impact on Bukowski -- both as a man and as a poet -- and his poems reveal an unexpected sympathy and tenderness for his fellow beings.

Ken Price's 15 full color acrylic and ink illustrations have been reproduced as serigraphs. Over two hundred color separations were required and the images are printed in more than 230 colors. Over 45,000 hand press runs were needed to print the edition. The brilliantly colored hard-edge images, like the poetry, reflect Los Angeles in all its sprawl, grit and grandeur. Seen through smog and heat, Price's brooding images of familiar streets and buildings reveal a certain dignified squalor and fully capture the vision of both poet and artist."