Men of Steel Help Fight the War / J & L Steel by Frank Vittor

Men of Steel Help Fight the War / J & L Steel by Frank Vittor

Men of Steel Help Fight the War / J & L Steel

Frank Vittor

Title

Men of Steel Help Fight the War / J & L Steel

 
Artist

Frank Vittor

  1888 - 1968 (biography)
Year
c. 1940  
Technique
pencil and crayon drawing, design for a float 
Image Size
9 1/8 x 15 1/4" image 
Signature
pencil, lower right corner of paper 
Edition Size
1 of 1 unique 
Annotations
titled withiin image; lower right: Frank Vittor, Sculptor / 1828 Fifth Avenue; upper right, in ink: OK as submitted / Willian S. Rial, Jr.; stamped in blue ink: William S. Rial, Jr / 1st Lt., Ord. Dept. / Adjunct. 
Reference
 
Paper
heavy cream wove 
State
 
Publisher
 
Inventory ID
18751 
Price
$2,000.00 
Description

This drawing by Pittsburgh, PA sculptor Frank Vittor appears to be a sketch for a sculpture for a parade float that was submitted to the US military. The float was to be 22' long and 13' high and depicted a steelworker, perhaps the legendary "man of steel" Joe Magarac working at the Bessamer furnace that ultimately melted him down.

The sculpture rests on a base that read "MEN OF STEEL HELP FIGHT THE WAR." At each end of this were 3 munitions shells. This was riding on a motorized bed that was draped with a fabric that had the logo "J & L Steel" at the front and back.

The Jones & Laughlin Steel Company originally produced iron and began the production of steel in 1886. The company expanded operations on both sides of the Monongahela River as well as a plant which opened in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. in 1905. J & L, as it came to be known by the steelworkers, provided the most able competition in the region to the Carnegie Steel Co.

The drawing was accepted by the US Army by 1st Lt. William S. Rial (later Major Rial) who was an Adjunct for the US Army Ordinance Department who was probably sponsering the float in a July 4th parade. Whether or not the sculpture and/or float were finished has not yet been determined.