Study for the Saint and the Sinner #4 - Fables series by June Claire Wayne

Study for the Saint and the Sinner #4 - Fables series by June Claire Wayne

Study for the Saint and the Sinner #4 - Fables series

June Claire Wayne

Title

Study for the Saint and the Sinner #4 - Fables series

 
Artist
Year
1956  
Technique
litho crayon, ink drawing, and ink spray (applied using a "Flit gun") 
Image Size
22 15/16 x 29" image and paper size 
Signature
ink, lower left 
Edition Size
1 of 1 unique 
Annotations
ink, lower left image: "4th Study for the / Sinner - Fable Series / 1956 / Wayne" 
Reference
Conway 102.1; JD.5290-4; B 44 
Paper
heavy cream wove 
State
 
Publisher
 
Inventory ID
18035 
Price
$7,500.00 
Description

In the mid-1950s Wayne and UCLA's philosophy department head Abraham Kaplan began a suite of fables, which Kaplan would write the fables and Wayne would create lithographs as illustrations. However, Kaplan's work was interrupted, and Wayne abandoned the project to begin new ones.

This early, rare drawing was done utilizing a “Flit gun”, a hand-pumped insecticide sprayer used to dispense Flit, a brand-name insecticide widely used against flies and mosquitoes. Wayne comments on page 116 of her raisonne: "The fable is a good one: a sinner is caught off guard by the arrival of the Messiah at the gates of the city. He mounts his donkey and flees in the opposite direction."

Though it was exhibited in four major venues in the late 1950s, this drawing is not illustrated in the catalogue raisonne. Conway notes: "Despite it having been exhibited in four important venues, this drawing has not been located. It was most likely destroyed by the artist. Since it and the following entry are numbered in a series of five, we can assume that at least three other unrecorded studies are also lost."

It was exhibited at the deYoung Museum, 1956; Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1958; L.A. County Museum, 1959.

When June Wayne saw this again in January of 2011 she commented that she had also done a painting of this subject which was destroyed by water from a leak in her studio and this drawing was the only record of the study.