Jubilo (Joy) by Adja Yunkers

Jubilo (Joy) by Adja Yunkers

Jubilo (Joy)

Adja Yunkers

Title

Jubilo (Joy)

 
Artist

Adja Yunkers

  1900 - 1983 (biography)
Year
1953  
Technique
color woodcut 
Image Size
37 1/2 x 22 3/4" image 
Signature
lower right, pencil 
Edition Size
not editioned, only impression located 
Annotations
titled and dated "53" in pencil 
Reference
Not in Brooklyn Museum catalog 
Paper
antique-white hand made Japanese paper 
State
proof 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
17992 
Price
$3,000.00 
Description

Perhaps a unique impression, this large color woodcut is not in the Brooklyn Museum catalogue raisonne of Yunkers' prints. The composition reflects his interest in the Native American pictographs and the landscape that he saw in New Mexico, while living and teaching in Albuquerque. In April of 1953 the Rio Grande flooded and he lost much of his work. The fact that this impression is stamped “Made In USA” on the verso indicates it may have been in an exhibition overseas and is probably the only impression to have survived.

A major twentieth century abstract painter and printmaker, Adja Yunkers studied art in Leningrad, Berlin, Paris and London. Living in Hamburg, he became the protege of the great German Expressionist Emil Nolde, who helped arrange his first solo exhibition in Hamburg in 1921. For a period of fourteen years, Yunkers lived and worked in Paris. At the outbreak of World War II (1939), he moved to Stockholm, Sweden, where he edited and published the arts magazines, ARS and Creation. Adja Yunkers settled permanently in the United States in 1947.

During the following years important exhibitions of his woodcuts, lithographs and paintings were held at the Smithsonian Institute, the Corcoran Gallery, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The prints of Adja Yunkers are today included in the following collections: The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, the Hamburg Kunsthalle, the Stockholm National Gallery, the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Corcoran Museum, Harvard University and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.