Ballad of Francois Villon: The Wind (also called: Flight and The Wind Takes Their Likes Away) by Rico Lebrun

Ballad of Francois Villon: The Wind (also called: Flight and The Wind Takes Their Likes Away) by Rico Lebrun

Ballad of Francois Villon: The Wind (also called: Flight and The Wind Takes Their Likes Away)

Rico Lebrun

Title

Ballad of Francois Villon: The Wind (also called: Flight and The Wind Takes Their Likes Away)

 
Artist

Rico Lebrun

  1900 - 1964 (biography)
Year
1945  
Technique
lithograph 
Image Size
14 5/16 x 17 15/16" image 
Signature
pencil, lower right 
Edition Size
29 of 45  
Annotations
pencil dated and editioned 
Reference
 
Paper
antique-white wove 
State
published 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
16370 
Price
$1,500.00 
Description

A fine example of Lebrun's dark imagery of the mid 1940s while he was teaching in Mexico. An acknowledgment of the tragic life of 15th century poet/murderer/thief Francios Villon, a "Ballad" that has a violent edge - the alienated figure whose clothes are being ripped away by the wind while he brandishes a knife in a life and death struggle.

The French poet Francois Villon was born in Paris in 1431 (the year that Joan of Arc was burned at the stake). Villon became a student in arts, perhaps at about twelve years of age. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Paris (The Sorbonne) in 1449 and a master's degree in 1452. Between this year and 1455, nothing is known of his activities.

On June 5, 1455, at age 24, the first major recorded incident of his life occurred. A scuffle broke out between Villon and the priest Philippe Sermaise; daggers were drawn and Sermaise, who is accused of having threatened and attacked Villon and drawn the first blood, received a dagger-thrust in return. He died of his wounds. Villon fled, and was sentenced to banishment.

After that, Villon continued a life of thievery and skullduggery, continuing to chronicle it in his poems. He disappeared sometime around 1463, at around age 32. He might have died on a straw mat in some cheap tavern, or in a cold, dank cell; or in a fight in some dark street with another French thief; or perhaps, as he always feared, on a gallows in a little town in France.