King Lear by Ernest Bradford Freed

King Lear by Ernest Bradford Freed

King Lear

Ernest Bradford Freed

Title

King Lear

 
Artist
Year
1961  
Technique
color intaglio 
Image Size
35 3/4 x 45 3/4" platemark 
Signature
lower right margin, pencil 
Edition Size
A/P (from an edition of at least 10) 
Annotations
title, dated 
Reference
"cat #3-44" in ink on upper right margin; Artist's Proof issue no. 7, page 5; Prize Winning Graphics II, 1964, page 9 (illustrated). 
Paper
heavy wove 
State
 
Publisher
artist 
Inventory ID
11114 
Price
$2,500.00 
Description

Ernest Freed had to build a special press and order oversize paper in order to print a series of large, experimental prints he was working on, based on Shakespearean subjects. Freed had learned printmaking at Iowa with Mauricio Lasansky and was not afraid to take on a large format using varying intaglio techniques. For these works he also cut up old plates and arranged them on the new composition as well as adding fabrics and other materials to the plate surface. He printed them himself with the aid of his family.

"KIng Lear" was illustrated on page 9 in the 1964 book "Prize Winning Graphics II". Freed made this comment about this print:

"'King Lear' was executed on a very large plate with color shapes developed by the use of mahogany plywood panels. The forms of the king and his three daughters emerge from an inky blackness of uncertainty and irrationality. Although the imagery is apparent, there are shifting and submerging shapes which are constantly equivocal.

The physical strain of developing and printing this work seems to be an inseparable part of the total experience. The methods used in developing it involved a trial and error process to find the right movement of form. As the plate grew, the imagery became more clearly understood.

Technique is an involved process serving this end, but never is displayed for its own sake. In fact, the means to the end results are so covered as to be unrecognizable, or for that fact, even remembered."